Cervical Dystonia

The previous chapter shows the delicate connections in the cerebrospinal structure. Once the TMJ and/or C2 are distorted, the entire structure will follow and collapse. And this will negatively impact the body-brain communication through restriction of the foramen magnum as well as restriction of the jugular foramen, another opening in the base of the skull transmitting veins, arteries, and nerves.

This can lead to a variety of problems. The mechanical consequences are of course obvious. When the spinal balance is broken, the head and neck will start to drop forward and tilt, the spine will be bent (scoliosis, kyphosis), the pelvis will be tipped, etc.

Due to the malfunction in body-brain communication, various other neurological problems may arise. In the below sections, a summary and classification is given of the most common disorders which – in FCST – are associated with spinal collapse.

This can lead to a variety of problems. The mechanical consequences are of course obvious. When the spinal balance is broken, the head and neck will start to drop forward and tilt, the spine will be bent (scoliosis, kyphosis), the pelvis will be tipped, etc.

Due to the malfunction in body-brain communication, various other neurological problems may arise. In the below sections, a summary and classification is given of the most common disorders which – in FCST – are associated with spinal collapse.

 Cervical Dystonia (spasmodic torticollis)

Within the framework of FCST, the main cause of cervical dystonia is considered to be subluxation of the upper cervical vertebrae, as well abnormality of the brain-nerve system due to imbalance of the TMJ. Tertiary nerves around the TMJ area are concatenated to the Atlas and the Axis along the brainstem. Abnormalities in TMJ thus cause subluxation in the occipito atlantoaxial joint, which in turn generates a distorted signal to the brain-nerve system. This leads to errors in the brain-nerve system that cause involuntary cramps, spasms, and pain in the cervical area. As a consequence, the head will move away from its centered position. The symptoms generally worsen over time.

Other disorders associated with brain-nerve (CNS) damage

Writer’s Cramp (Focal Hand Dystonia), Blepharospasm, Meige’s Syndrome, Oromandibular Dystonia (Cranial Dystonia), Spasmodic Dysphonia (Laryngeal Dystonia), Generalized Dystonia, Parkinson’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Tourette’s Syndrome, Alzheimer’s Disease, Spinocerebellar Degeneration, Stroke Sequelae, Myasthenia Gravis, Unidentified Paralysis, Epilepsy, Convulsive Disease, Stroke Sequelae, Autism.

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